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In the News

2015

  • SRI's 8th Annual Speaker - Everything you always wanted to know about BIG DATA but were afraid to ask.
    • Friday, March 20, 2015 - Juan Miguel Lavista

      Currently the principal data scientist for Microsoft Data Science team (cDnA), working on Machine Learning, Causal inference, and Statistical modeling searching for insights in petabytes of data. He also worked as part of the Bing Data Mining team. Before joining Microsoft, he was the CTO and co-founder of alerts.com

      From data to insights, from machine learning to controlled experiments, this talk will cover the power of big data and data science, the myths surrounding it, and both its problems and successes.

      His talk was delivered on Friday, March 20, 2015 from 2-3pm, in the Statler Auditorium on the Cornell Ithaca campus. See the video for more information this presentation.

  • Class Spotlight: Taking America's Pulse and Cornell Chronicle Article
    • Friday, May 15, 2015 - Jon Schuldt and Peter Enns

      Communication Professor Jon Schuldt and Government Professor Peter Enns are teaching a relatively new course at Cornell which promises students the chance to "design, conduct, and analyze a national-level public opinion survey." The survey is wholly designed and run by the students, consisting entirely of the issues that matter to them - one question per student. Typically, students tend to form questions based on similar interests in the class.

      Imagine you had the chance to find out what Americans thought about almost any conceivable topic. Perhaps you'd want to know how Americans felt about aggression on social media. Maybe you'd be curious about how opinions on U.S. relations with China have recently evolved? Or how Americans viewed the quality of their education?

      This poster session is the final research product based on the national public poll that students created and conducted as part of the course. They work very closely with Yasamin Miller and with SRI to conduct the poll, and the students conducted over half of the phone interviews (n=612) themselves.